The Weaver Story - Part 4. Tamanna, Employer of rural women and men having immense skills.

The touch and feel of woven work can only be felt by the ones who own a Chanderi. Chanderi is one of the reputably-known artform in the handloom clusters in India. Predominantly, famous for its sarees, made with a blend of silk and cotton from the town of  Chanderi in the North of Madhya Pradesh. Across India, Chanderi has become a mark of legacy and pride. It is a perpetual tradition from the times of royal festivities to modern-day functions. Chanderi is an artform belonging to the second half of the twentieth century. Subsequently, there have been changes in the paradigms, processes, methodologies, types of equipment and even the compositions of yarns in the past. However, the sarees have remained to be a mark of royalty.

Tamanna, one such weaver of Chanderi saree, joining forces with Luxurion World by clubbing together of cotton and silk Chanderi from across 50 looms and Karigars that work relentlessly to make this art refined and flawless. She and her husband have their origin from the family of weavers and had enough courage to set up their own venture-out of love for the craft. While working conditions for most weavers across Madhya Pradesh is in turmoil, their Chanderi production operation runs smoothly as they engage rural women and men who have enormous skills.

 As people sought after power-loomed fabric and material, Chanderi had alike other artforms, started to lose its charm in recent times. However, weavers like Tamanna, took the plunge to promote this traditional handicraft through channels of exhibitions and social media. A classic saree that takes 4-5days to complete has a lot more value-added when it comes directly from the point of origin of the Chanderi tradition. Truly said, the weavers are the symbol of the heritage, as they have been the recipient of appreciation, even from the royals, across ages. 

Tammana adds, "Despite a very complicated and intricate process of production (beginning from 'Resham' and ending with handcrafted loomed 'Saree'), these Karigaars have handed a helping hand in keeping alive the culture of Madhya Pradesh and spreading it across India."